Rhubarb – Uses, Dosage, Side Effects

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Rhubarb is a cultivated plant in the genus Rheum in the family Polygonaceae. It is a herbaceous perennial growing from short, thick rhizomes. Historically, different plants have been called rhubarb in English and used for two distinct purposes. The roots of some species were first used in medicine. Later, the fleshy, edible stalks (petioles) of other species and hybrids (culinary rhubarb) were cooked and used for food. The large, triangular leaves contain high levels of oxalic acid, making them inedible. The small flowers are grouped in large compound leafy greenish-white to rose-red inflorescences.

Nutritional Value of Rhubarb

Rhubarb, raw
Nutritional value per 100 g (3.5 oz)
Energy 88 kJ (21 kcal)
Carbohydrates
4.54 g
Sugars 1.1 g
Dietary fiber 1.8 g
Fat
0.3 g
Protein
0.8 g
Vitamins QuantityDv
Thiamine (B1)
2%

0.02 mg

Riboflavin (B2)
3%

0.03 mg

Niacin (B3)
2%

0.3 mg

Pantothenic acid (B5)
2%

0.085 mg

Vitamin B6
2%

0.024 mg

Folate (B9)
2%

7 μg

Choline
1%

6.1 mg

Vitamin C
10%

8 mg

Vitamin E
2%

0.27 mg

Vitamin K
28%

29.3 μg

Minerals Quantity%DV
Calcium
9%

86 mg

Iron
2%

0.22 mg

Magnesium
3%

12 mg

Manganese
9%

0.196 mg

Phosphorus
2%

14 mg

Potassium
6%

288 mg

Sodium
0%

4 mg

Zinc
1%

0.1 mg

Percentages are roughly approximated using US recommendations for adults.
Source: USDA Nutrient Database

 

Uses/ Indications of Rhubarb

  • Rhubarb is grown primarily for its fleshy leafstalks, technically known as petioles. The use of rhubarb stalks as food is a relatively recent innovation. This usage was first recorded in 18th to 19th-century England after affordable sugar became more widely available.
  • Commonly, it is stewed with sugar or used in pies and desserts, but it can also be put into savory dishes or pickled. Rhubarb can be dehydrated and infused with fruit juice. In the United States, it is usually infused with strawberry juice to mimic their popular strawberry rhubarb pie.

Food

The species Rheum Ribes has been eaten in the Islamic world since the 10th century.

  • In Northern Europe and North America, the stalks are commonly cut into pieces and stewed with added sugar until soft. The resulting compote, sometimes thickened with corn starch, can then be used in pies, tarts and crumbles. Alternatively, greater quantities of sugar can be added with pectin to make jams. The most popular accompanying spice to use is ginger, although cinnamon and nutmeg are also popular additions.
  • In the United Kingdom, as well as being used in the typical pies, tarts and crumbles, rhubarb compote is also combined with whipped cream and/or custard to make respectively rhubarb fool and rhubarb and custard.
  • In the United States, the common usage of rhubarb in pies has led to it being nicknamed ‘pie plant’, by which it is referred to in many 19th century US cookbooks. Rhubarb in the US is also often paired with strawberries to make a strawberry-rhubarb pie, though some rhubarb purists jokingly consider this “a rather unhappy marriage.
  • In former days, a common and affordable sweet for children in parts of the United Kingdom and Sweden was a tender stick of rhubarb, dipped in sugar. It is still eaten this way in western Finland, Norway, Canada, Iceland, Lithuania, the Faroe Islands and Sweden, and also some other parts of the world.
  • Rhubarb can also be used to make alcoholic drinks, such as fruit wines or Finnish Rhubarb sima (mead). It is also used to make Kompot. Being a bit sour, it is very refreshing and can be drunk cold, especially during the summer.

Traditional Chinese medicine

In traditional Chinese medicine, rhubarb roots of a number of species have been thought of as a laxative for several millennia. Rhubarb also appears in medieval Arabic and European prescriptions. It was one of the first Chinese medicines to be imported to the West from China.

References

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