White Panax Ginseng – Nutritional Value, Health Benefits

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White Panax Ginseng/Ginseng tea, or insam-cha insam means ginseng and cha mean tea in Korean, is a traditional Korean tea made with ginseng. While it is called tea, ginseng tea does not contain tea leaves. It is a herbal tea infusion made out of the ginseng plant’s root.[rx] Ginseng is a perennial herb derived from the aromatic root of Panax Ginseng Meyer, also known as Korean ginseng.[rx][rx] Ginseng grows in shady forests that are cool and damp.[rx] It is a slow-growing plant and is difficult to cultivate.[rx] It can take four to six years before the root is ready to be harvested.[rx]

Ginseng Tea benefits became widely used in China many thousands of years ago. The same is the case today, although it has since spread throughout the world. The health benefits of ginseng tea may include a boosted immune system, reduced risk of developing cancer, relief from menstrual problems, and a reduction in obesity. It may help in decreasing mental distress and sexual problems as well.

Other Name

  • Asian Ginseng,
  • Asiatic Ginseng,
  • Chinese Ginseng,
  • Chinese Red Ginseng,
  • Ginseng,
  • Ginseng Asiatique,
  • Ginseng Blanc,
  • Ginseng Blanc de Corée,
  • Ginseng Chinois,
  • Ginseng Coréen,
  • Ginseng Coréen Rouge,
  • Ginseng de Corée,
  • Ginseng Japonais,
  • Ginseng Oriental,
  • Ginseng Panax,
  • Ginseng Radix Alba,
  • Ginseng Root,
  • Ginseng Rouge,
  • Ginseng Sino-coréen,
  • Ginseng Tibétain,
  • Guigai, Hong Shen,
  • Japanese Ginseng,
  • Jen-Shen, Jinsao,
  • Jintsam, Insam,
  • Korean Ginseng,
  • Korean Ginseng Root,
  • Korean Panax,
  • Korean Panax Ginseng,
  • Korean Red Ginseng,
  • Korean White Ginseng,
  • Manchurian Ginseng,
  • Mandragore de Chine,
  • Ninjin, Ninzin,
  • Oriental Ginseng,
  • Panax Coréen,
  • Panax Ginseng Blanc,
  • Panax schinseng,
  • Racine de Vie,
  • Radix Ginseng Rubra,
  • Red Chinese Ginseng,
  • Red Ginseng,
  • Red Kirin Ginseng,
  • Red Korean Ginseng,
  • Red Panax Ginseng,
  • Ren Shen, Renshen,
  • Renxian, Sang, Seng,
  • Sheng Shai Shen, Tibetan Ginseng,
  • White Ginseng,
  • White Panax Ginseng.

What is Ginseng Tea?

Ginseng is a slow-growing perennial plant belonging to the Araliaceae (ivy) family. There are several types available, including Korean Ginseng (Panax ginseng), American Ginseng (Panax quinquefolius), and the somewhat more distantly-related Siberian Ginseng (Eleutherococcus senticosus). Each one has a unique appearance and also boasts distinct characteristics.

Broadly, however, the root of the plant is two to three inches long (it can sometimes be twice the size) and one inch thick. It is this component, regardless of the specific variety, used in the making of Ginseng Root Tea.

Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) has long held the herb in high regard, having applied it to their holistic healing for millennia. Now, though, Ginseng Tea benefits enjoy the support of modern science.

But, perhaps most important of all, what does it taste like? Korean Red Ginseng Tea and American Ginseng tend to have sweet, earthy notes with almost citrusy undertones.

This is relatively similar to Siberian Ginseng, although some also describe it as grassier in flavor. The bottom line is that, despite having slightly different tastes, they are all unmistakably delicious!

Ginseng Tea Properties

Korean Red Ginseng Tea and American Ginseng have the most in common when it comes to Ginseng Tea properties. Siberian Ginseng, meanwhile, is sort of like the “aunt” at the family gathering who isn’t technically an aunt at all. Rather, she is a family friend who merely considers herself an aunt. Siberian Ginseng, in other words, is a “Ginseng” Tea in name only.

Let’s then look at the beneficial chemical compounds found in those recognized as “real” Ginseng. The most remarkable ones are, undoubtedly, ginsenosides, which improve your life in small yet significant ways. This is because they combat free radicals in the body, the product of natural, though often harmful, human oxidation. In doing so, they reduce the risk of developing a multitude of chronic conditions.

But ginsenosides aren’t the only beneficial properties. There are indeed many more vitamins, minerals and other antioxidants contained within, all of which contribute to Ginseng Tea benefits. Better still, this infusion usually only contains around two calories per 8-oz serving. It is, then, an excellent alternative to sugary, fatty soft drinks – all the while tasting great.

Ginseng tea originated in Korea and was made from a Korean variety of ginseng. Tea has become a popular beverage all over the world as an herbal drink. One serving of this tea (3 g) may contain 3g of carbohydrates and 11 calories. The available tea is made from 3 different types of ginseng, all of which can be highly beneficial for human health and vitality. These are:

  • American ginseng: Grows in North America
  • Asian ginseng: Grows in Far East Asia. It is also known as Korean ginseng or Chinese ginseng
  • Siberian ginseng: Grows in Northeast Asia

Types of Ginseng Tea

As the popularity of Chinese herbal medicines has grown worldwide, the cost of ginseng has risen with greater demand. This, along with a lack of regulations managing the way ginseng is sold, has led to many imitations in the form of powders, supplements, and teas. Today, buying “ginseng tea”, especially at a low price point, is unlikely to contain a significant dose of true ginseng root. There are three kinds of infusions commonly named Ginseng Tea.

  • Steeped Ginseng Root Tea- The traditional preparation of Korean ginseng tea infuses the root directly in boiling water and sweetens the bitter brew with honey. This method uses no true tea, though it may also include other flowers or herbs for flavor variation or additional benefits.
  • Flavored Ginseng Tea – Modern ginseng teas that are produced on a large scale typically use a powdered form of ginseng to coat the leaves. These teas typically use lightly oxidized, rolled oolongs as the base, and cover them in an exterior layer of additives. While it is possible for this style of tea to contain some true ginseng in powdered form, it is typically sweetened with artificial substances like aspartame to avoid bitterness, and it is often difficult or impossible to verify the list of ingredients.
  • Blended Ginseng Tea – Because of our shop’s history as an herbal apothecary, we are able to make our own blended version of ginseng tea using small pieces of pure white ginseng root. The bitterness of ginseng is released more slowly by brewing small pieces instead of powder, while the natural sweetness and floral notes of our Taiwanese oolong Tung Ting provide a balance of flavors. We make no claims regarding the health benefits of this brew, but we do think it is a delicious and approachable tea.
  • Korean Ginseng Tea,
  • Ginseng Root Tea (Siberian),
  • Red Ginseng Tea (Flavoured Green Tea),
  • Ginseng Tea (Flavoured Black Tea), and
  • Ginseng Oolong (Flavoured Oolong).

Best Benefits Of Ginseng Tea

Nutrition Facts

Beverages, tea, green, ready to drink, ginseng and honey, sweetened
Serving Size:
NutrientValue
Water [g]92.65
Energy30
Energy [kJ]127
Total lipid (fat) [g]0.18
Carbohydrate, by difference [g]7.16
Sugars, total including NLEA [g]6.87
Sucrose [g]0.49
Glucose (dextrose) [g]2.79
Fructose [g]3.59
Calcium, Ca [mg]3
Iron, Fe [mg]0.02
Magnesium, Mg [mg]1
Potassium, K [mg]5
Sodium, Na [mg]2
Zinc, Zn [mg]0.01
Copper, Cu [mg]0.01
Manganese, Mn [mg]0.12
Vitamin C, total ascorbic acid [mg]7.7
Thiamin [mg]0.04
Caffeine [mg]4
Sources include: USDA [rx]

Health Benefits of Ginseng Tea

The common health benefits of ginseng tea are as follows:

  • Ginseng Tea and Brain Function – In the UK alone, around 750,000 people live with conditions such as Dementia and Alzheimer’s Disease. According to experts, this could even double in the next 40 years as Britain’s population ages.mIs there a chance of Ginseng Tea benefits being the answer? Not quite the FULL answer, admittedly, but it could, at the very least, offer a helping hand. The best results, however, came from upping the dosage from 200 to 400 milligrams daily. This saw an improvement in calmness and mental arithmetic capabilities for the duration of the eight-day treatment. It is vital to note, though, that despite these incredible findings, research remains in its preliminary stages. In other words, until we know more, The Kent and Sussex Tea and Coffee Company does NOT endorse this Tea for this purpose. Instead, we await further evidence.

A British study conducted by the Brain Performance and Nutrition Research Centre found correlations between drinking Ginseng Tea and improved brain function. The research indicated that 200 milligrams of it consumed daily for eight days slowed the fall in mood of all thirty participants.

  • Ginseng Tea for Erectile Dysfunction – Ginseng Tea benefits sexually active people because, according to some scientists, it reduces instances of erectile dysfunction. This condition is characterized by an inability to get or maintain an erection. It affects around 5% of men over the age of forty, increasing to 15% at 70-years-old. And so, the question begs: is there any proof that Ginseng Tea for erectile dysfunction works? It remains to be seen, however, whether this holds up outside of clinical trials. Once again, then, we recommend you exercise caution before choosing Ginseng Tea for erectile dysfunction.

The evidence comes from a 2002 study published in the Journal of Urology, which saw forty-five male participants with clinically diagnosed erectile dysfunction split into two groups. The first group consumed Panax Ginseng Tea, while the second group received a placebo. Researchers concluded that a 900-mg dose of this herb, particularly when taken three times daily, dramatically improved erectile dysfunction symptoms compared to those who had the placebo.

  • May Have Anticancer Potential – Ginseng may have a potential anti-tumor effect and may often be used with other drugs to enhance chemotherapy, according to a report published in the Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine (2014). However, the Chinese researchers who conducted this study state that future clinically relevant studies may be needed to validate the use of ginseng to treat cancer. According to the American Academy of Family Physicians, this tea may possess several anti-carcinogenic properties. [rx] [rx]
  • May Relieve Menstrual Cramps – American ginseng tea may be well-known for its cooling effect, and it may be recommended for women who suffer from menstrual cramps and distress. It might also minimize the stomach pain associated with menstruation.
  • May Help Fight Obesity – If you want to shed those extra pounds, ginseng tea may certainly help you in your dietary habits. This herbal tea is popular as a natural appetite suppressant. Consuming it may provide slimness to the body by boosting your metabolism and burning fat at a higher rate.
  • May Lower Blood Pressure – Asian ginseng tea may be a strong beverage and it may be very effective for people who have hypotension. This energetic drink might help to keep you active and on your toes all day long by normalizing your blood pressure and boosting your energy. This tea also may help in preventing fatal strokes.
  • May Improve Brain Function – Ginseng tea may be an herbal drink that acts as a stimulant to the brain cells. It may improve your concentration power and cognitive capabilities. It may be highly recommended for students so they can have improved brain functioning.
  • May Help Prevent Sexual Dysfunction – Men with erectile dysfunction should consume ginseng tea since it may lessen the symptoms of sex-related conditions. [rx]
  • May Stabilize Sugar Levels – Ginseng modestly yet significantly may improve fasting blood glucose in people with and without diabetes. In order to address the uncertainty in our effect may estimate and provide better assessments of ginseng’s anti-diabetic efficacy, larger and longer randomized controlled trials using standardized ginseng preparations are warranted.

A study from the Medicine journal shows that ginseng-related [rx] therapy may exert better blood sugar levels. Additionally, it could be a better alternative for drug-naïve diabetic patients, rather than as an adjunct therapy in patients on anti-diabetic medications.

  • May Improve Digestion – Ginseng tea may promote the secretion of pepsin. This may aid in better digestion and provide relief from bloating, constipation, flatulence, and Crohn’s disorder. [rx]
  • May Relieve Respiratory Issues – Ginseng tea may soothe respiratory issues by clearing the blockage and reducing inflammation. It might even be a great remedy for sinuses, cold, cough, asthma, flu, and pneumonia. It also[rx] might strengthen the immune system. [rx] [rx]
  • May Reduce Chronic Pain – The anti-inflammatory properties of ginseng tea may cure inflammations such as rheumatoid arthritis as well as chronic pains. [rx]
  • May Help In Skin Care – Ginseng may maintain the fluid balance in your body and therefore might help in refining and rehydrating the skin. It may also lessen pain and injury due[rx] to radiation therapy. The antioxidant may perform free radical scavenging activity making your[rx] skin look younger and healthier. Additionally, it might reduce fine lines, wrinkles, age spots, and blemishes. [rx] [rx] [rx]
  • May Purify Blood – Ginseng tea may be mildly diuretic. Thus, it might lower blood toxicity by purifying it. [rx]
  • May Relieve Symptoms of ADHD – A combination of ginseng and ginkgo Biloba may help provide relief from symptoms of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in kids.
  • May Have Neuroprotective Effects – The immune-stimulatory, homeostasis, antioxidant, anti-apoptotic properties of ginseng tea may help prevent or manage various cognitive disorders. This might include severe neurological disorders like Parkinson’s and dementia too.
  • May Reduce Stress – De-stress yourself with a hot cup of ginseng tea. It might help to pep up your mood by calming the nervous system and improving blood circulation.
  • Korean Ginseng Tea Weight Loss – Ginseng Tea benefits weight loss in three potential ways. One such example is, as mentioned previously, the unquestionable fact that it contains only two calories per 8-oz serving. The second way, although not proven outright, is that it boosts the metabolism of fat cells. This, in turn, could enable the body to burn fat not only quicker but also more efficiently. Third and finally, both American Ginseng and Korean Ginseng might act as an appetite suppressants, thus helping you with your portion control.

Unsurprisingly, though, these infusions aren’t going to do all of the work for you. If you TRULY want to fit into your favourite pair of jeans again, then, you will need to adhere to a healthy and active lifestyle. Sorry, folks. No miracles here.

  • Helps Boost Your Immune System – The body’s immune system is our most crucial line of defense. It is an expansive network of cells, organs, proteins, and tissues working together to protect us from seemingly endless pathogens. Without it, we’d be open to attack from viruses, parasites, and harmful bacteria. Its ability to distinguish our tissue from foreign tissue, in particular, is key to our survival. So, where do Ginseng Tea benefits come in here? Each variety contains high concentrations of Vitamin C, which most people will know already is a great supporter of the immune system.

Additionally, it could be worth noting that during the 1950s, Soviet scientists extensively researched Siberian Ginseng. The validity of their evidence, however, has since come into question.

  • Help with Fibromyalgia – Fibromyalgia is a condition known for causing widespread pain and extreme tiredness. Although its symptoms can vary from person to person, most experience it as pain all over the body. What causes fibromyalgia is uncertain – and, sadly, there is no cure. Nevertheless, painkillers, talking therapies and exercise programs may help. There is also the possibility of Ginseng Tea benefits offering support. In one randomized, double-blind, controlled clinical trial, 39 female participants, all aged between 27 and 58, were split into three groups. The first group received 100-mg of Korean Ginseng, the second group 25-mg of amitriptyline (a commonly used drug for fibromyalgia) and the third group a placebo.

The herb, in particular, underwent standardization so that it contained precisely 27% ginsenosides every time. Three weeks into the treatment, those taking Ginseng Tea noticed an improvement in fatigue by what amounted to 25.9%. By the twelfth week, fatigue had reduced by 46.5%, while sleep quality had improved by 44.3%.

  • Ginseng Tea Help with Diabetes – Statistics suggest that an estimated 4 million people, including those who’re currently undiagnosed, are living with diabetes in the UK alone. This represents around 6% of Britain’s population – or one in every sixteen people having diabetes (diagnosed or undiagnosed). Both American and Korean Ginseng Tea, meanwhile, could balance blood sugar levels.

The answers come from a study published in Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine. It involved investigating the effects of six grams of Korean Red Ginseng, along with the typical anti-diabetic medication or diet, in nineteen people with type-2 diabetes. Participants, after twelve weeks, were able to maintain good blood sugar control, as well as having had an 11% decrease in overall levels. Another study published in the Journal of the American College of Nutrition had similar findings – the primary difference being it used American Ginseng.

  • Our skin is the largest organ – one that requires plenty of care by us. You’ll be pleased to know, then, that drinking this Tea (and perhaps even applying it topically) might help in protecting it. This is because of its abundance in ginsenoside, which evidence has been found to inhibit inflammation while increasing antioxidant capacity in skin cells. Such is its anti-inflammatory potential, in fact, that it might help those with eczema. It goes further still. One study accessed the influence of Korean Ginseng Tea on eighteen young male athletes who took the herb three times daily for seven days.

Next, the men had levels of certain inflammatory markers analyzed after performing an exercise test. These levels proved to be remarkably lower than in a placebo group – and lasted for 72 hours afterward.

Others Health Benefits

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Possibly Effective for

  • Alzheimer’s disease. Evidence shows that taking Panax ginseng root daily for 12 weeks can improve mental performance in people with Alzheimer’s disease.
  • A lung disease is called chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Taking Panax ginseng by mouth seems to improve lung function and some symptoms of COPD.
  • Mental function. Taking Panax ginseng by mouth might improve abstract thinking, mental arithmetic skills, and reaction times in healthy, middle-aged people but not in young adults. Panax ginseng alone does not seem to improve memory. But there is some evidence that a combination of Panax ginseng and ginkgo leaf extract can improve memory in otherwise healthy people between the ages of 38 and 66.
  • Erectile dysfunction (ED). Taking Panax ginseng by mouth seems to improve sexual function in men with erectile dysfunction.
  • Flu. Taking specific Panax ginseng by mouth appears to reduce the risk of getting a cold or the flu. But, taking Panax ginseng does not seem to reduce flu symptoms or the length of the illness.
  • Multiple sclerosis-related fatigues. Taking Panax ginseng daily for 3 months reduces feelings of tiredness and improves the quality of life in females with MS.
  • Premature ejaculation. Applying a cream containing Panax ginseng, angelica root, Cistanches deserticola, Zanthoxylum species, toroids seed, clover flower, Asia sari root, cinnamon bark, and toad venom (SS Cream) to the penis one hour before intercourse and washing off immediately before intercourse seems to help prevent premature ejaculation.
  • Sexual arousal. Taking powdered Korean red ginseng, a specific form of Panax ginseng seems to improve sexual arousal and satisfaction in postmenopausal women. Also, using a specific product containing Korean red ginseng and other ingredients (ArginMax for Women, Daily Wellness Company) seems to improve sexual desire in women who report sexual problems.
  • Athletic performance. Taking Panax ginseng by mouth for up to 8 weeks does not improve exercise performance.

Insufficient Evidence to Rate Effectiveness for

  • Age-related memory loss. Taking a specific product containing Panax ginseng and other ingredients (Memo, Pharco Pharmaceuticals) by mouth for 4 weeks improves memory in elderly people with some mental impairment.
  • Breast cancer. Research conducted in China suggests that some people with breast cancer treated with any form of ginseng (American or Panax) have a higher quality of life and lower risk of death. However, this might not be a result of taking the ginseng. The people in the study were also likely to be treated with the prescription anticancer drug tamoxifen. It is difficult to know how much of the benefit to attribute to ginseng.
  • Infection of the airways in the lung (bronchitis). Taking a specific Panax ginseng extract (G115) by mouth, combined with antibiotics, might be more effective in killing bacteria in the lungs of people with long-term bronchitis than antibiotic treatment alone.
  • Cancer. Research suggests that taking ginseng by mouth might decrease the occurrence of some types of cancer, including stomach cancer, lung cancer, liver cancer, ovarian cancer, and skin cancer. However, other research shows that Panax ginseng doesn’t reduce the risk of getting cancer. But several studies show that Panax ginseng might slow cancer growth and improve quality of life in cancer patients.
  • Common cold. There is some evidence that taking a specific Panax ginseng extract (G115) by mouth can decrease the chance of catching a cold.
  • Heart failure. Taking Panax ginseng by mouth daily, without or without conventional medications, seems to improve heart function.
  • Diabetes. There is inconsistent evidence about the effects of Panax ginseng on diabetes. Some research shows that taking Panax ginseng by mouth daily can improve blood sugar levels. However, other research suggests that taking Panax ginseng (AIPOP, Gangdown-Do, Korea) or Korean red ginseng, a type of Panax ginseng, by mouth does not improve blood sugar levels in people with diabetes.
  • Fatigue. Research suggests that taking Panax ginseng daily for 4 weeks reduces some, but not all, symptoms of fatigue.
  • Fibromyalgia. Research suggests that taking Panax ginseng root extract by mouth daily for 12 weeks does not improve pain, tiredness, sleep quality, anxiety, tender points, or quality of life in people with fibromyalgia.
  • Gallbladder disease. Research suggests that taking Panax ginseng together with medication for 24 weeks does not reduce gallstones.
  • Bad breath. Early research suggests that taking Korean red ginseng, a type of Panax ginseng, daily for 10 weeks helps reduce bad breath. This is especially true in people with stomach ulcers from H. pylori infection.
  • Hangover. Research suggests that drinking a beverage containing Panax ginseng extract within 5 minutes of drinking alcohol and eating a piece of cheese might lower blood alcohol levels and reduce hangover symptoms.
  • Hearing loss. Early research suggests that taking Panax ginseng for 14 days reduces temporary hearing loss caused by loud noise. But it might be less effective than N-acetyl cysteine at preventing temporary hearing loss caused by loud noise.
  • HIV. Early evidence shows that Korean red ginseng, a type of Panax ginseng, might increase immune function. But it does not affect how much of the HIV virus is circulating in the blood of people with HIV.
  • High blood pressure. There is inconsistent evidence about the effects of Panax ginseng on blood pressure in people with high blood pressure. Some early research shows that taking Panax ginseng in three divided doses daily for 8 weeks slightly reduces blood pressure in people with high blood pressure. But taking a specific Panax ginseng product (Ginseol K-g1) daily for 8 weeks does not reduce blood pressure in people with mildly high blood pressure.
  • Prediabetes. Taking a combination of Korean red ginseng and cheonggukjang, a type of fermented soybean paste, can reduce pre-meal blood sugar levels in people with prediabetes. Also taking fermented Panax ginseng can reduce post-meal blood sugar levels and increase post-meal insulin levels in people with prediabetes.
  • Male infertility. Swollen prostate caused by Chlamydia infection is associated with reduced male fertility. Early research suggests that taking a specific product containing Panax ginseng (Fertimev) along with an antibiotic improves sperm concentration and sperm movement in people with swollen prostate caused by Chlamydia.
  • Memory. Taking a specific Panax ginseng extract (G115) together with vitamins, minerals, and dimethylaminoethanol bitartrate might improve memory in people with memory problems.
  • Menopausal symptoms. Panax ginseng seems to improve some, but not all, symptoms associated with menopause. Some early research suggests that Panax ginseng might improve quality of life and menopausal symptoms, such as fatigue, insomnia, and depression in postmenopausal women. Panax ginseng also seems to reduce cholesterol levels in postmenopausal women. There are mixed results regarding whether Panax ginseng reduces hot flashes. Panax ginseng does not appear to improve memory or concentration in postmenopausal women.
  • Quality of life. While some research suggests that Panax ginseng might improve quality of life, other research shows no benefit.
  • Wrinkled skin. Early research shows that taking a combination of Korean red ginseng root with Troilus fructus and Corni Fructus daily for 24 weeks might reduce wrinkles. But it does not appear to affect skin moisture, elasticity, thickness, or color.
  • Depression.
  • Anxiety.
  • Anemia.
  • Fluid retention.
  • Stomach inflammation and other digestive problems.
  • Chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS).
  • Fever.
  • Swine flu.
  • Sleeping problems (insomnia).
  • Disorders of pregnancy and childbirth.
  • Convulsions.
  • Bleeding disorders.
  • Loss of appetite.
  • Nerve pain.
  • Joint pain.
  • Dizziness.
  • Aging.
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Ginseng Tea Side Effects

Ginseng Tea benefits are the gifts that keep on giving, right? Sadly, not always. There have been some cases, however rare, of this infusion causing side effects.

Those who are currently undergoing some sort of hormonal treatment, for example, should avoid it. There is also the chance of it leading to increased heart rates, high blood pressure, headaches, loss of appetite, and insomnia.

The Kent and Sussex Tea and Coffee Company, first and foremost, cares about the welfare of its customers. As such, if you have any of the above symptoms, or suffer from the discomfort of any kind after drinking Ginseng Root Tea, you should consider seeking medical help.

Indeed, although there is much to celebrate about this beverage, it doesn’t work in the same way for everyone. So be careful.

Ginseng Tea Pregnancy

Is Ginseng Tea and pregnancy a good mix? Most essential of all, is it safe? Possibly. Few specific studies appear to exist making a case either for or against its consumption while expecting.

However, it is sometimes best to err on the side of caution. The same rules likewise apply to breastfeeding mothers. We recommend, as a result, that you speak to your midwife if you have any uncertainty.

There is a potential alternative, though, in Raspberry Leaf Tea (during the third trimester ONLY). Despite also being a Herbal Tea, this particular infusion could come with scientifically proven pregnancy benefits.

Specifically, mothers-to-be choose it for toning the muscles of the uterus, which then helps while in labor. Furthermore, it could reduce the risk of interventions and complications.

Ginseng Tea Caffeine

An estimated sixty plants naturally contain caffeine, a stimulating chemical compound capable of boosting energy. This includes Tea (Camellia sinensis), Coffee Beans (Coffea), and Yerba Mate (Ilex paraguariensis).

Ginseng, on the other hand, isn’t a “Tea” in the conventional sense. What it is, then, is a Herbal “Tisane,” although this name is rarely used.

Due to its lack of so-called “real” Tea leaves, this brew is 100% void of caffeine. That’s a great thing for those looking to cut down their caffeine intake; less so if you require that extra boost.

Ultimately, what you need out of your morning cuppa is down to you. Either way, you go, however, The Kent and Sussex Tea and Coffee Company is here to help.

How to Make Ginseng Tea

You’re probably thirsty by now. Good. It’s time you got brewing up, anyway. Consider browsing our range of Ginseng products, all of which taste great and come with health benefits.

Once you have everything to hand, all that’s left is to follow the instructions below. Before you know it, you’ll be enjoying a wholesome, delicious, nutritional cuppa from the comfort of your home.

Fresh ginseng tea can be easily made at home if you have the medicinal root on hand. Here is a simple recipe that can be made with fresh root or with ginseng powder.

1. Use a Tea Infuser / Filter.

  • Put Ginseng Tea into one of our Tea Filters / Infusers.

2. Boil the Kettle.

  • Brew freshwater using either filtered or bottled water.

3. Add Infuser or Filter to your Cup.

  • Place the Tea-filled accessory into a cup or mug.

4. Pour Freshly Boiled Water.

  • Fill the cup or mug with hot water straight off the boil.

5. Allow it to Steep / Infuse.

  • Let it infuse for 5-10 minutes (the longer you leave it, the stronger it tastes.)

6. Time to Indulge

  • Your Ginseng Herbal Tea is ready to enjoy at your leisure.

Ginseng Tea (Insam Cha) Recipe

A simple recipe to boost your strength and immunity!
  • Course: Tea
  • Cuisine: Korean
  • Keyword: Ginseng Tea, Insam Cha
  • Appliance: Saucepan, Tea Strainer
  • Cook Time: 15 minutes
  • Total Time: 15 minutes
  • Servings: 1 cup

Ingredients

  • 1 cup water filtered
  • 1 piece ginseng root or
  • 1 tbsp ginseng powder
  • 1 tsp lemon juice [17] optional
  • 1 tsp honey optional

Instructions

  • Boil the water in a saucepan.
  • Wash the ginseng root, peel it, and cut it into 3 slices.
  • Add the ginseng root pieces or powder to the hot water.
  • Allow the mixture to steep for 10 minutes.
  • Strain the tea into a cup.
  • Add lemon juice or honey for additional flavor, and enjoy the beverage!

Dosage

There is no single recommended dose of Panax ginseng. Various doses have been studied in research.

While Panax ginseng may boost your energy and help in the management of certain health conditions, if you’re considering taking it, it’s important to consult your healthcare provider first. The following doses have been studied in scientific research:

BY MOUTH

  • For Alzheimer’s disease: 4.5 to 9 grams of Panax ginseng root daily for 12 weeks has been used.
  • For chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD): 100 mg to 6 grams of Panax ginseng three times daily for up to 3 months has been used.
  • For mental function: 200 to 400 mg of a specific Panax ginseng extract (G115, Pharmaton SA, Lugano, Switzerland) taken once daily or in two divided doses for up to 12 weeks, or 200 to 960 mg as a single dose, has been used.
  • For erectile dysfunction: 1400 to 2700 mg of Panax ginseng, taken in two or three divided doses per day for up to 12 weeks, has been used.
  • For flu: 200 mg of Panax ginseng extract (G115) daily, starting 4 weeks before getting a flu shot and continuing for 8 weeks after, has been used. Also, 1 gram of Panax ginseng extract three times daily for 12 weeks has also been used.
  • For multiple sclerosis-related fatigues: 250 mg of Panax ginseng twice daily for 3 months has been used.
  • For sexual arousal: 3 grams of Korean red ginseng, a form of Panax ginseng, daily for 8 weeks has been used. A specific combination product (ArginMax for Women, The Daily Wellness Company), taken daily for 4 weeks, has also been used.

APPLIED TO THE SKIN

  • For premature ejaculation: a cream (SS-Cream) containing Panax ginseng and other ingredients has been applied to the glans penis one hour before intercourse and washed off before intercourse.

For example, a 2018 study that assessed 91 clinical trials regarding the effects of Panax ginseng on various health states reported that suitable dosages and recommendations were difficult to conclude due to the diversity of the trials.14 For these clinical trials, dosages ranged from 0.2 g to 9 g of Panax ginseng daily for four to 24 weeks.

Side Effects

The major side effects of ginseng tea include:

  • Insomnia: Certain compounds in ginseng may activate the energy levels in the body. If taken at bedtime, it may result in sleeping difficulties. If consumed daily, some people may start showing symptoms of insomnia.
  • Irregular heart rate and blood pressure: Consuming ginseng tea in large amounts for a long period may result in fluctuating heartbeat and increased or decreased blood pressure levels. People on medication for blood pressure should avoid ginseng tea.
  • Blood clots: The tea may interfere with the functioning of blood platelets causing blood clots.
  • Hormonal effects: Korean Ginseng tea may cause estrogenic effects on the body. This may cause hormonal abnormalities, breast pain, and vaginal bleeding, which may, in some cases, be fatal too.
  • Gastrointestinal issues: It may cause digestive disorders like diarrhea, stomach discomfort, and nausea.
  • Cognitive dysfunction: It may cause headaches, dizziness, nervousness, restlessness, anxiety, and loss of concentration in some people. Further complications may lead to neurological issues, depression, confusion, schizophrenia, and manic episodes.

According to the US Fish and Wildlife Service, it is illegal to harvest ginseng roots on most State lands. However, you can buy fresh ginseng root or powder from the market. Korean ginseng root is better suited for cold climates and American ginseng roots are best for summer seasons.[rx]

Interactions

Drug interactions may change how your medications work or increase your risk for serious side effects. This document does not contain all possible drug interactions.

  • Keep a list of all the products you use (including prescription/nonprescription drugs and herbal products) and share it with your doctor and pharmacist. Do not start, stop, or change the dosage of any medicines without your doctor’s approval.
  • Aspirin may also increase the risk of bleeding when used with this product. If your doctor has prescribed low doses of aspirin to prevent heart attack or stroke (usually 81-162 milligrams a day), you should continue to take the aspirin. Consult your doctor or pharmacist for more details.

EstrogensInteraction Rating: Moderate Be cautious with this combination. Talk with your health provider.

  • Panax ginseng might have some of the same effects as estrogen. However, Panax ginseng is not as strong as estrogen pills. Taking Panax ginseng along with estrogen pills might decrease the effects of estrogen pills.

Some estrogen pills include conjugated equine estrogens (Premarin), Ethinyl estradiol, estradiol, and others.

Furosemide (Lasix)Interaction Rating: Moderate Be cautious with this combination. Talk with your health provider.

  • Some scientists think that Panax ginseng might decrease how well furosemide (Lasix) works. But there isn’t enough information to know if this is a big concern.

Imatinib (Gleevec)Interaction Rating: Moderate Be cautious with this combination. Talk with your health provider.

  • Some medications, including imatinib, are changed and broken down by the liver. There is a report of liver toxicity in a 26-year-old man taking imatinib along with Panax ginseng. It is believed that Panax ginseng decreased how quickly the liver broke down this medication, increasing the effects and side effects of imatinib.
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InsulinInteraction Rating: Moderate Be cautious with this combination. Talk with your health provider.

  • Panax ginseng might decrease blood sugar. Insulin is also used to decrease blood sugar. Taking Panax ginseng along with insulin might cause your blood sugar to be too low. Monitor your blood sugar closely. The dose of your insulin might need to be changed.

Medications changed by the liver (Cytochrome P450 2D6 (CYP2D6) substrates)Interaction Rating: Moderate Be cautious with this combination. Talk with your health provider.

  • Some medications are changed and broken down by the liver. Panax ginseng might decrease how quickly the liver breaks down some medications. Taking Panax ginseng along with some medications that are changed by the liver can increase the effects and side effects of your medication. Before taking Panax ginseng, talk to your healthcare provider if you take any medications that are changed by the liver.

Some medications that are changed by the liver include amitriptyline (Elavil), clozapine (Clozaril), codeine, desipramine (Norpramin), donepezil (Aricept), fentanyl (Duragesic), flecainide (Tambocor), fluoxetine (Prozac), meperidine (Demerol), methadone (Dolophine), metoprolol (Lopressor, Toprol XL), olanzapine (Zyprexa), ondansetron (Zofran), tramadol (Ultram), trazodone (Desyrel), and others.

Medications changed by the liver (Cytochrome P450 3A4 (CYP3A4) substrates)Interaction Rating: Moderate Be cautious with this combination. Talk with your health provider.

  • Some medications are changed and broken down by the liver. Panax ginseng might decrease how quickly the liver breaks down some medications. Taking Panax ginseng along with some medications that are changed by the liver can increase the effects and side effects of your medication. Before taking Panax ginseng, talk to your healthcare provider if you take any medications that are changed by the liver.

Some medications that are changed by the liver include calcium channel blockers (diltiazem, nicardipine, verapamil), chemotherapeutic agents (etoposide, paclitaxel, vinblastine, vincristine, vindesine), antifungals (ketoconazole, itraconazole), glucocorticoids, cisapride (Propulsid), alfentanil (Alfenta), fentanyl (Sublimaze), losartan (Cozaar), fluoxetine (Prozac), midazolam (Versed), omeprazole (Prilosec), ondansetron (Zofran), propranolol (Inderal), fexofenadine (Allegra), and numerous others.

Medications for depression (MAOIs)Interaction Rating: Moderate Be cautious with this combination. Talk with your health provider.

  • Panax ginseng might stimulate the body. Some medications used for depression can also stimulate the body. Taking Panax ginseng with these medications used for depression might cause too much stimulation. This might cause side effects such as anxiousness, headache, restlessness, and insomnia.

Some of these medications used for depression include phenelzine (Nardil), tranylcypromine (Parnate), and others.

Medications for diabetes (Antidiabetes drugs)Interaction Rating: Moderate Be cautious with this combination. Talk with your health provider.

  • Panax ginseng might decrease blood sugar. Diabetes medications are also used to lower blood sugar. Taking Panax ginseng along with diabetes medications could add to the effects of diabetic medications and lower blood sugar too much. Monitor your blood sugar closely. The dose of your diabetes medication might need to be changed.

Some medications used for diabetes include glimepiride (Amaryl), glyburide (DiaBeta, Glynase PresTab, Micronase), insulin, pioglitazone (Actos), rosiglitazone (Avandia), chlorpropamide (Diabinese), glipizide (Glucotrol), tolbutamide (Orinase), and others.

Medications that can cause an irregular heartbeat (QT interval-prolonging drugs)Interaction Rating: Moderate Be cautious with this combination. Talk with your health provider.

  • Panax ginseng may cause an abnormal heartbeat when taken short-term. Taking Panax ginseng with drugs that can cause an irregular heartbeat might cause serious side effects, including heart rhythm problems (arrhythmias).

Some medications that affect the heartbeat include amiodarone (Cordarone), disopyramide (Norpace), dofetilide (Tikosyn), ibutilide (Corvert), procainamide (Pronestyl), quinidine, sotalol (Betapace), thioridazine (Mellaril), and many others.

Medications that decrease the immune system (Immunosuppressants)Interaction Rating: Moderate Be cautious with this combination. Talk with your health provider.

  • Panax ginseng increases the immune system. By increasing the immune system, Panax ginseng might decrease the effectiveness of medications that decrease the immune system.
  • Some medications that decrease the immune system include azathioprine (Imuran), basiliximab (Simulect), cyclosporine (Neoral, Sandimmune), daclizumab (Zenapax), muromonab-CD3 (OKT3, Orthoclone OKT3), mycophenolate (CellCept), tacrolimus (FK506, Prograf), sirolimus (Rapamune), prednisone (Deltasone, Orasone), corticosteroids (glucocorticoids), and others.

Medications that slow blood clotting (Anticoagulant / Antiplatelet drugs)Interaction Rating: Moderate Be cautious with this combination. Talk with your health provider.

  • Panax ginseng might slow blood clotting. Taking Panax ginseng along with medications that also slow clotting might increase the chances of bruising and bleeding.
  • Some medications that slow blood clotting include aspirin, cilostazol (Pletal), clopidogrel (Plavix), diclofenac (Voltaren, Cataflam, others), ibuprofen (Advil, Motrin, others), naproxen (Anaprox, Naprosyn, others), dalteparin (Fragmin), enoxaparin (Lovenox), heparin, ticlopidine (Ticlid), warfarin (Coumadin), and others.

Midazolam (Versed)Interaction Rating: Moderate Be cautious with this combination. Talk with your health provider.

  • Some medications, including midazolam, are changed and broken down by the liver. Panax ginseng might increase how quickly the liver breaks down midazolam. In theory, taking Panax ginseng along with midazolam may decrease the effects of midazolam.

Nifedipine (Procardia)Interaction Rating: Moderate Be cautious with this combination. Talk with your health provider.

  • Panax ginseng might affect how much nifedipine is available in the body. Taking Panax ginseng along with nifedipine might increase the blood pressure lowering effects of nifedipine.

RaltegravirInteraction Rating: Moderate Be cautious with this combination. Talk with your health provider.

  • Raltegravir is a drug used to treat people with HIV. Raltegravir has been associated with liver toxicity in some people. Taking Panax ginseng with raltegravir might increase the risk of liver toxicity in some people taking raltegravir.

Stimulant drugs Interaction Rating: Moderate Be cautious with this combination. Talk with your health provider.

  • Stimulant drugs speed up the nervous system. By speeding up the nervous system, stimulant medications can make you feel jittery and speed up your heartbeat. Panax ginseng might also speed up the nervous system. Taking Panax ginseng along with stimulant drugs might cause serious problems including increased heart rate and high blood pressure. Avoid taking stimulant drugs along with Panax ginseng.

Some stimulant drugs include diethylpropion (Tenuate), epinephrine, phentermine (Ionamin), pseudoephedrine (Sudafed), and many others.

Warfarin (Coumadin)Interaction Rating: Moderate Be cautious with this combination. Talk with your health provider.

  • Warfarin (Coumadin) is used to slow blood clotting. There is some concern that Panax ginseng might decrease the effectiveness of warfarin (Coumadin). But it’s not clear if this interaction is a big problem. Be sure to have your blood checked regularly. The dose of your warfarin (Coumadin) might need to be changed.

Fexofenadine (Allegra)Interaction Rating: Minor Be cautious with this combination. Talk with your health provider.

  • Fexofenadine is taken to treat seasonal allergies. When taken together with fexofenadine, Panax ginseng might reduce how much fexofenadine is available in the body. However, there isn’t enough information to know if this is a big concern.

Medications changed by the liver (Cytochrome P450 1A1 (CYP1A1) substrates)Interaction Rating: Minor Be cautious with this combination.Talk with your health provider.

  • Some medications are changed and broken down by the liver. Panax ginseng might increase how quickly the liver breaks down some medications. Taking Panax ginseng along with some medications that are changed by the liver can decrease the effects and side effects of your medication. Before taking Panax ginseng, talk to your healthcare provider if you take any medications that are changed by the liver.

Some medications that are changed by the liver include chlorzoxazone, theophylline, and bufuralol.

Do not start, stop, or change the dosage of any medicine before checking with your doctor or pharmacist first.

PRECAUTIONS & WARNINGS

  • Pregnancy and breastfeeding – Panax ginseng is when taken by mouth during pregnancy. One of the chemicals in Panax ginseng has been found to cause birth defects in animals. Do not use Panax ginseng if you are pregnant. Not enough is known about the safety of Panax ginseng during breastfeeding. Stay on the safe side and avoid use.
  • Infants and children – Panax ginseng is in infants and children. Using Panax ginseng in babies has been linked to poisoning that can be fatal. The safety of Panax ginseng in older children is not known. Until more is known, do not use Panax ginseng even in older children.
  • Auto-immune diseases” such as multiple sclerosis (MS), lupus (systemic lupus erythematosus, SLE), rheumatoid arthritis (RA), or other conditions – Panax ginseng seems to increase the activity of the immune system. It might make auto-immune diseases worse. Don’t use Panax ginseng if you have any auto-immune condition.
  • Bleeding conditions – Panax ginseng seems to interfere with blood clotting. Don’t use Panax ginseng if you have a bleeding condition.
  • Heart conditions – Panax ginseng can affect heart rhythm and blood pressure slightly on the first day it is used. However, there are usually no changes with continued use. Nevertheless, Panax ginseng has not been studied in people with cardiovascular disease. Use Panax ginseng with caution if you have heart disease.
  • Diabetes – Panax ginseng might lower blood sugar. In people with diabetes who are taking medications to lower blood sugar, adding Panax ginseng might lower blood sugar too much. Monitor your blood sugar closely if you have diabetes and use Panax ginseng.
  • Hormone-sensitive conditions such as breast cancer, uterine cancer, ovarian cancer, endometriosis, or uterine fibroids – Panax ginseng contains chemicals (ginsenosides) that can act like estrogen. If you have any condition that might be made worse by exposure to estrogen, don’t use Panax ginseng.
  • Trouble sleeping (insomnia) – High doses of Panax ginseng have been linked with insomnia. If you have trouble sleeping, use Panax ginseng with caution.
  • Organ transplant – Panax ginseng might make the immune system more active. This could interfere with the effectiveness of medications that are given after an organ transplant to reduce the chance that the organ will be rejected. If you have received an organ transplant, don’t use Panax ginseng.
  • Schizophrenia (a mental disorder) – High doses of Panax ginseng have been linked with sleep problems and agitation in people with schizophrenia. Be careful when using Panax ginseng if you have schizophrenia.
  • Organ transplant – Panax ginseng might make the immune system more active. This could interfere with the effectiveness of medications that are given after an organ transplant to reduce the chance that the organ will be rejected. If you have received an organ transplant, don’t use Panax ginseng.

From Where To Buy

Prince Of Peace Instant Korean Panax Ginseng Tea - 100 Count
2,678 Reviews
Prince Of Peace Instant Korean Panax Ginseng Tea - 100 Count
  • Made from authentic Korean ginseng roots, which have been taken for overall health & well being for thousands of years
  • It is commonly used to alleviate stress & fatigue, and the antioxidant properties contained in Korean ginseng help boost the body's immune system
  • Korean Ginseng is very stimulating
  • Increase Metabolism, Boost Energy
  • Made in Korea

References