Short Wave Diathermy Indications, Contraindications

Short Wave Diathermy Indications
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Short Wave Diathermy Indications is a therapeutic modality that is most commonly used for joint conditions such as rheumatoid arthritis and osteoarthritis. The term diathermy refers to the creation of heat using electrical pulses. In diathermy, a high-frequency electric current is delivered via shortwave, microwave, or ultrasound which is able to generate deep heat in body tissues. The heat can be used to improve circulation and/or to relieve pain. In addition, shortwave diathermy can be used in medicine for treating damaged tissues and relaxing muscles.

Types of Short Wave Diathermy

Diathermy used in surgery is of typically two types.[9rx]

  • Monopolar – where the electric current passes from one electrode near the tissue to be treated to another fixed electrode (indifferent electrode) elsewhere in the body. Usually, this type of electrode is placed in contact with buttocks or around the leg.[rx]
  • Bipolar – where both electrodes are mounted on the same pen-like device and an electric current passes only through the tissue being treated. The advantage of bipolar electrosurgery is that it prevents the flow of current through other tissues of the body and focuses only on the tissue in contact. This is useful in microsurgery and in patients with a cardiac pacemaker.

Diathermy is a therapeutic modality that is most commonly used for joint conditions such as rheumatoid arthritis and osteoarthritis. The term diathermy refers to the creation of heat using electrical pulses. In diathermy, a high-frequency electric current is delivered via shortwave, microwave, or ultrasound which is able to generate deep heat in body tissues. The heat can be used to improve circulation and/or to relieve pain. In addition, shortwave diathermy can be used in medicine for treating damaged tissues and relaxing muscles.

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Uses/ Short Wave Diathermy Indications

Short Wave Diathermy

Some typical uses/ indications for shortwave diathermy treatment are described as follows:

  • Chronic arthritis – induction or condenser electrodes (distance from the treated body region, respectively 2–4cm for the active electrode and 2–4cm for the passive electrode), dosage II–III, treatment duration 5–10 minutes per joint.
  • Back pains – induction or condenser electrodes (distance from the treated body region, respectively 2–4cm for the active electrode and 2–4cm for the passive electrode), dosage II–III, treatment duration 15–20 minutes
  • Neuralgia/Neuropathy – condenser electrodes (distance from the treated body region, respectively 2–4cm for the active and 2–4cm for the passive electrode), dosage II-IV, treatment duration 15–20 minutes
  • Tendonitis – condenser electrodes (distance from the treated body region, respectively 2 cm for the active and 4 cm for the passive electrode), dosage II–III, treatment duration 5–10 minutes
  • Chronic sinusitis – condenser electrodes (distance from the treated body region, respectively 2–4cm for the active and 2–4cm for the passive electrode), dosage II, treatment duration 10–15 minutes
  • Chronic otitis – condenser electrodes (distance from the treated body region, respectively 1–3 cm for the active and 4–6 cm for the passive electrode), dosage II, treatment duration 10–15 minutes
  • Chronic tonsillitis – condenser electrodes (distance from the treated body region, respectively 3 cm for the active and 3 cm for the passive electrode), dosage II, treatment duration 10–15 minutes
  • Chronic laryngitis – condenser electrodes (distance from the treated body region, respectively 1–3 cm for the active and 1–3 cm for the passive electrode), dosage II–III, treatment duration 10–15 minutes
  • Bronchial asthma – condenser electrodes (distance from the treated body region, respectively 6 cm for the active and 6 cm for the passive electrode), dosage II–III, treatment duration 10–15 minutes
  • Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) – condenser electrodes (distance from the treated body region, respectively 4 cm for the active and 4–10 cm for the passive electrode), dosage II-IV, treatment duration 15–20 minutes
  • Chronic colitis – condenser electrodes (distance from the treated body region, respectively 2–3 cm for the active and 3 cm for the passive electrode), dosage II–III, treatment duration 10–15 minutes
  • Chronic pyelonephritis – condenser electrodes (distance from the treated body region, respectively 4–6 cm for the active and 6 cm for the passive electrode), dosage II–III, treatment duration 10–15 minutes
  • Chronic prostatitis – condenser electrodes (distance from the treated body region, respectively 2–4cm for the active and 3–5 cm for the passive electrode), dosage II–III, treatment duration 10–15 minutes
  • Chronic adnexitis – condenser electrodes (distance from the treated body region, respectively 2–4 cm for the active and 4–6 cm for the passive electrode), dosage II–III, treatment duration 15–20 minutes
  • Ovarian endocrinological dysfunction – condenser electrodes (distance from the treated body region, respectively 2–4cm for the active and 6 cm for the passive electrode), dosage II–III, treatment duration 10–15 minutes
  • Mastitis – induction or condenser electrodes (distance from the treated body region, respectively 3–5 cm for the active and 4–6 cm for the passive electrode), dosage III, treatment duration 5–10 minutes
  • Frostbite – condenser electrodes (distance from the treated body region, respectively 2–3 cm for the active and 2–3 cm for the passive electrode), dosage II–III, treatment duration 10–15 minutes.
  • Arthritis
  • Fibromyalgia
  • muscle spasms
  • Myositis
  • Neuralgia
  • Sprains and strains
  • Tenosynovitis
  • Tendonitis
  • Bone injuries
  • Bursitis
  • Tenosynovitis
  • Bursitis
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Contraindication

  • Tissues previously treated with deep X-ray or radiation
  • Tuberculosis (local)
  • Damaged or at-risk skin, i.e. skin rash, eczema
  • Anesthetic areas
  • Excitable tissue,
  • With pregnant women
  • Around the eyes, breasts, or sexual organs
  • Over fractured bones
  • Near or over an implanted electrical stimulation device
  • Women who are pregnant should consult their physician before beginning IRR light therapy treatments.
  • Clients with epilepsy should consult their physician before beginning IRR light therapy treatments.
  • You must wait five days after Botox or cosmetic fillers.
  • Some thyroid conditions.
  • Tuberculosis
  • People with a history of skin cancer
  • Systemic Lupus erythematosus should also avoid this kind of treatment.
  • The use of photosensitizing medications (i.e. lithium, melatonin, phenothiazine antipsychotics, and certain antibiotics).
  • Diseases that involve the retina of the eye
  • Acute inflammation
  • Infected open wound
  • Malignant tissue
  • Severe/excessive edema
  • Metallic implant
  • Cardiac pacemaker
  • Over wet dressing
  • Unreliable patient
  • Impaired thermal sensation
  • Recent radiotherapy
  • Severe cardiac abnormality
  • Blood pressure abnormality
  • Over the stellate ganglion
  • For hemophiliacs not covered by factor replacement
  • The spinal cord after laminectomy

References

Short Wave Diathermy Indications

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