Amygdalin; Food Source, Health Benefits

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Amygdalin is found in almond. Bitter glycoside of the Rosaceae, found especially in kernels of cherries, peaches and apricots. Amygdalin is present in cold-pressed bitter almond oil from the above sources prior to enzymic hydrolysis and steam distillation for food use Amygdalin , C20H27NO11, is a glycoside initially isolated from the seeds of the tree Prunus dulcis, also known as bitter almonds, by Pierre-Jean Robiquet and A. F. Boutron-Charlard in 1803, and subsequently investigated by Liebig and Wohler in 1830, and others. Several other related species in the genus of Prunus, including apricot (Prunus armeniaca) and black cherry (Prunus serotina), also contain amygdalin. It was promoted as a cancer cure by Ernst T. Krebs under the name “Vitamin B17“, but studies have found it to be ineffective. Amygdalin is sometimes confounded with laevomandelonitrile, also called laetrile for short; however, amygdalin and laetrile are different chemical compounds.

Amygdalin is a cyanogenic glucoside isolated from almonds and seeds of other plants of the family Rosaceae. Amygdalin is converted by plant emulsion (a combination of a-glucosidase and a nitrilase) or hydrochloric acid into benzaldehyde, D-glucose, and hydrocyanic acid. (NCI04)

Food Source of Amygdalin

Amygdalin is found in almond. Bitter glycoside of the Rosaceae, found especially in kernels of cherries, peaches and apricots. Amygdalin is present in cold-pressed bitter almond oil from the above sources prior to enzymic hydrolysis and steam distillation for food use Amygdalin , C20H27NO11, is a glycoside initially isolated from the seeds of the tree Prunus dulcis, also known as bitter almonds, by Pierre-Jean Robiquet and A. F. Boutron-Charlard in 1803, and subsequently investigated by Liebig and Wohler in 1830, and others. Several other related species in the genus of Prunus, including apricot (Prunus armeniaca) and black cherry (Prunus serotina), also contain amygdalin. It was promoted as a cancer cure by Ernst T. Krebs under the name “Vitamin B17“, but studies have found it to be ineffective. Amygdalin is sometimes confounded with laevomandelonitrile, also called laetrile for short; however, amygdalin and laetrile are different chemical compounds.

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